ARTHUR'S

Pink Flamingo 

 CLIPART

Free flamingo clipart, images, pictures, gif bitmap graphics, spoonbill, pink flamingo, American flamingo, greater flamingo, is of large format and is suitable for presentations and projects and school usage for both students and educaters etc. The large images are too big for use on the internet. However you may use the thumbnail clip art pictures for web pages. Selections of both colour and black and white clip art are available, the latter are suitable for coloring books. Please do not use them in any other collections of clipart.

The Greater Flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus) is the most widespread species of the flamingo family. It is found in parts of Africa, southern Asia (coastal regions of Pakistan and India) and southern Europe (including Spain, Sardinia, Albania, Turkey, Greece, Cyprus, Portugal, and the Camargue region of France). Some populations are short distance migrants, and records north of the breeding range are relatively frequent; however, given the species' popularity in captivity whether these are truly wild individuals is a matter of some debate. This is the largest species of flamingo, averaging 110-150 cm (43-60 in) tall and weighing 2-4 kg (4.4-8.8 lbs). The largest male flamingoes have been recorded at up to 187 cm (74 in) tall and 4.5 kg (10 lbs). It is closely related to the American Flamingo and Chilean Flamingo, with which it is has sometimes been considered conspecific, but that treatment is now widely (e.g. by the American and British Ornithologists' Union) as incorrect and based on a lack of evidence.

Like all flamingos, this species lays a single chalky-white egg on a mud mound.

Most of the plumage is pinkish-white, but the wing coverts are red and the primary and secondary flight feathers are black.

The bill is pink with a restricted black tip, and the legs are entirely pink. The call is a goose-like honking.

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Last updated June 2014