ARTHUR'S

Alice in Wonderland

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This free clip art is of large format and is suitable for presentations and projects and school usage for both students and educaters etc. The large images are too big for use on the internet. However you may use the thumbnail clip art pictures for web pages. Selections of both colour and black and white clip art are available, tha latter are suitable for coloring books. Please do not use them in any other collections of clipart.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) is a novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. It tells the story of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit-hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar and anthropomorphic creatures.

The tale is filled with allusions to Dodgson's friends (and enemies), and to the lessons that British schoolchildren were expected to memorize. The tale plays with logic in ways that have given the story lasting popularity to adults as well as children. It is considered to be one of the most characteristic examples of the genre of literary nonsens, and its narrative course and structure has been enormously influential, mainly in the fantasy genre.

The book is commonly referred to by the abbreviated title Alice in Wonderland, an alternative title popularized by the numerous stage, film and television adaptations of the story produced over the years.

Alice in Wonderland is also a 1951 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and originally premiered in London, England on July 26, 1951 by RKO Pictures. It is the thirteenth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. . The film features the voices of Kathryn Beaumont as Alice  and Ed Wynn as the Mad Hatter. Made under the supervision of Walt Disney himself, this film and its animation are often regarded as some of the finest work in Disney studio history, despite the lackluster, even hostile, reviews it originally received, especially in the UK.

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Last updated February 2009